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Recent papers on sea level

posted Jan 12, 2009, 5:56 AM by Aslak Grinsted   [ updated Sep 10, 2010, 3:56 AM ]
I've recently published a paper where we predict a ~1 m sea level rise by 2100.


This is quite compatible with other recent studies. Here's a summary i found on the web (written by cce, reformatted and updated by me)

0.7 to 1.6 m by 2100 (Grinsted et al. 2009)
Grinsted et al. 2009, Reconstructing sea level from paleo and projected temperatures 200 to 2100AD
http://www.glaciology.net/Home/PDFs/Announcements/gslprojection [see also by Jevrejeva et al. 2010]
Anthropogenic forcing dominates 20th century sea level rise.
Jevrejeva, Grinsted, Moore (2009), Anthropogenic forcing dominates sea level rise since 1850, Geophys. Res. Lett.,doi:10.1029/2009GL040216 [Here]
0.5 - 1.4 m by 2100 (assuming very long response time)
Rahmstorf 2007, A Semi-Empirical Approach to Projecting Future Sea-Level Rise [see also Vermeer & Rahmstorf 2009
http://www.pik-potsdam.de/~stefan/Publications/Nature/rahmstorf_science_2007.pdf
0.8 m 'most likely' starting point. 2.0 m max by 2100.
Pfeffer et al. 2008, Kinematic Constraints on Glacier Contributions to 21st-Century Sea-Level Rise
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/321/5894/1340
Average 1.6 m per century under sustained temperatures 2+ degrees above present
Rohling et al. 2007, High rates of sea-level rise during the last interglacial period
http://www.umces.edu/President/STWG/Rohlingetal2007.pdf
IPCC AR4 projections should be considered "minimum" even without ice sheet dynamics.
Carlson et al. 2008, Rapid early Holocene deglaciation of the Laurentide ice sheet
http://pubs.giss.nasa.gov/docs/2008/2008_Carlson_etal.pdf
Short sea level response time in interglacial climate (<2kyr)
Dutton et al. ngeo2009, Phasing and amplitude of sea-level and climate change during the penultimate interglacial
Ice-sheet instability during the terminal phase of the LIG (sudden 3m jump in sea level – comparable to MWP1a)
Blanchon et al. 2009, Rapid sea-level rise and reef back-stepping at the close of the last interglacial highstand, Nature
IPCC AR4 projections should be considered "minimum" even without ice sheet dynamics.
Carlson et al. 2008, Rapid early Holocene deglaciation of the Laurentide ice sheet
http://pubs.giss.nasa.gov/docs/2008/2008_Carlson_etal.pdf
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